Native Pollinators of the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness

Alexis Adams

About
Alexis Adams

Alexis Adams

Lexy grew up at the edge of the Beartooth Mountains, in Red Lodge, and on an island off the coast of the Peloponnese Peninsula in Greece. The landscapes of these places have shaped her life, her parenting (she is the mother of two teens) and her writing ever since, steering her focus to the intersections between food, culture and the environment and, most recently, migratory pollinators, nectar pathways and the toll humans have on these creatures, processes and places. Lexy has contributed to Scientific American, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Oxford University Press, the Food & Environment Reporting Network, and many other outlets. These assignments have taken her—and sometimes her kids—by foot into the mountains of the Peloponnese to find one of the last producers of an ancient cheese, to the eastern Aegean to research the mastic tree and the culture and villages it spawned, to New Mexico to study climate change’s impact on an ancient system of irrigation, and to the poverty-stricken Arizona–Sonora borderlands to write about efforts to invigorate the region’s economy by restoring habitat for more than 900 species of wild pollinators.